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Kirk Knight Tells Us About Becoming a Man, His New Album, and More

Brooklyn rapper Kirk Knight wants you to check your credit score.

Not so he can brag about his own or how many zeroes he has in his bank account, he’s just about growth and responsibility these days. Knight came through the Music Choice offices recently to chat about his brand new album It Is What It Is. He talked about maturing as an artist (he produced and wrote everything on the record) and as a man. Which includes knowing why that credit score is important.

He also joined in on the newest episode of Delete or Retweet where we ran through some of his old posts. He had to decide if he would keep or toss them. Check that out above and head here for more Music Choice video greatness.

Music Choice: You spent your summer in Europe touring with Flatbush Zombies. You and that crew get into anything crazy over there?

Kirk Knight: Nah not this time. My DJ has all the crazy stories from this trip! To be honest with you, this is probably the first tour where I was just learning from everyone around me. Other tours were more about going crazy on stage and f*cking with girls and stuff. This time, now that the album is about out, I was in the zone and focused on learning on how to market myself as an artist on stage. It was almost like I was Neo in that Matrix scene where they’re downloading all the fight tricks and stuff into him!

MC: After completing the run, are you a successful touring artist now?

KK: Definitely. I want people to feel the emotion in the music and I think, anyone at the shows can feel that the experience is different. I’ve learned how to give more of my heart on stage.

MC: How does that manifest itself?

KK: I like to think of the crowd as a recording booth. If it’s the beginning of a verse I’ll go lower and then as soon as it gets to 4 bars I’ll raise my voice to show excitement. Just small technical things like that. I’m a producer too so I will attack things technically. I know what songs to jump around to and when to have a mic stand. Before I was just rapping my bars into the mic. Not like I was unenthusiastic, I was too enthusiastic! I was running out of breath on stage. Now I’m learning breathing control.

MC: You’re from the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn. What is it about the area that produces such a wide variety of artists? You’re from there and Flatbush Zombies and Jidenna and Casanova. Quite the array of sounds.

KK: It’s just the type of people. There’s nobody in our generation besides like Busta Rhymes, and he’s still way before us. Everyone is just showing off our culture. I don’t think there’s necessarily one thing we all have in common… man, that’s hard to explain.

I think our music is just the different interpretations of what Flatbush is to us. At the end of the day though we all know the culture and grittiness of the neighborhood. Then at the end of the day, it could still be any one of us hanging out and rolling spliffs. I had never really thought about that. I’m just like “nigga, I’m from Flatbush!”

MC: Your new album It Is What It Is s being released on your birthday (11/16), was that the plan all along?

KK: Nope! The label gave me the date and I was like… that’s my birthday, let’s do it!

MC: You got a big celebration set up?

KK: I’m a man of many mysteries. I don’t want to say too much. I’ll have all of Brooklyn showing up to my sh*t!

MC: Did you produce the whole album?

KK: I produced, I wrote the songs, I rapped everything. There are no features on this album. It’s all me. I just wanted a very personal album that engaged the fans that have been rocking with me for so long.

I dropped Late Knight Special when I was 19 and was still becoming a man then. I feel like I didn’t get to articulate myself the way I wanted to. I think this album is really about my growth. People are seeing me, like, making R&B and pop songs. I’m trying to get my credit and get what I deserve.

MC: Speaking of growth, how are you showing your maturation here? What kind of man have you become?

KK: I believe I’m a man at this point. I moved out of my mother’s house when I was 15, 16. That’s when everything started to formulate for me. Like, I started to realize about bills and stuff! You get older and realize the consequences of not paying them on time and how it affects your credit score and then you can’t get a crib.

When you start understanding all those things it just naturally affects the music. You realize the responsibilities you have as a human being and as a man.

MC: You’re not breaking down how to check your credit score on the album, but it definitely is a more mature effort. Do you worry about those fans who have been rocking with you for so long being like, “this isn’t the Kirk Knight we partied with back then”?

KK: No because I feel like I’m genreless. Music and any person’s album is a chapter from their life. Not every chapter is the same in a book. If they were, that’d be a boring book!

MC: You’ve mentioned in past interviews about being in touch with your feminine side, is that something you still feel comfortable with? Not always the easiest thing to claim in rap music.

KK: I’m extremely comfortable with myself and my sound. I’m comfortable with my ambition and my passion. I try to compare myself, like when I was younger I’d compare myself to other people’s aspirations but I couldn’t really relate. If I couldn’t personally relate, I could let my music reach others. There could be these feelings that I don’t relate to but someone else could. A huge thing for me was realizing that the world isn’t built around one person.

 

Kirk Knight Tells Us About Becoming a Man, His New Album, and More

Brooklyn rapper Kirk Knight wants you to check your credit score.

Not so he can brag about his own or how many zeroes he has in his bank account, he’s just about growth and responsibility these days. Knight came through the Music Choice offices recently to chat about his brand new album It Is What It Is. He talked about maturing as an artist (he produced and wrote everything on the record) and as a man. Which includes knowing why that credit score is important.

He also joined in on the newest episode of Delete or Retweet where we ran through some of his old posts. He had to decide if he would keep or toss them. Check that out above and head here for more Music Choice video greatness.

Music Choice: You spent your summer in Europe touring with Flatbush Zombies. You and that crew get into anything crazy over there?

Kirk Knight: Nah not this time. My DJ has all the crazy stories from this trip! To be honest with you, this is probably the first tour where I was just learning from everyone around me. Other tours were more about going crazy on stage and f*cking with girls and stuff. This time, now that the album is about out, I was in the zone and focused on learning on how to market myself as an artist on stage. It was almost like I was Neo in that Matrix scene where they’re downloading all the fight tricks and stuff into him!

MC: After completing the run, are you a successful touring artist now?

KK: Definitely. I want people to feel the emotion in the music and I think, anyone at the shows can feel that the experience is different. I’ve learned how to give more of my heart on stage.

MC: How does that manifest itself?

KK: I like to think of the crowd as a recording booth. If it’s the beginning of a verse I’ll go lower and then as soon as it gets to 4 bars I’ll raise my voice to show excitement. Just small technical things like that. I’m a producer too so I will attack things technically. I know what songs to jump around to and when to have a mic stand. Before I was just rapping my bars into the mic. Not like I was unenthusiastic, I was too enthusiastic! I was running out of breath on stage. Now I’m learning breathing control.

MC: You’re from the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn. What is it about the area that produces such a wide variety of artists? You’re from there and Flatbush Zombies and Jidenna and Casanova. Quite the array of sounds.

KK: It’s just the type of people. There’s nobody in our generation besides like Busta Rhymes, and he’s still way before us. Everyone is just showing off our culture. I don’t think there’s necessarily one thing we all have in common… man, that’s hard to explain.

I think our music is just the different interpretations of what Flatbush is to us. At the end of the day though we all know the culture and grittiness of the neighborhood. Then at the end of the day, it could still be any one of us hanging out and rolling spliffs. I had never really thought about that. I’m just like “nigga, I’m from Flatbush!”

MC: Your new album It Is What It Is s being released on your birthday (11/16), was that the plan all along?

KK: Nope! The label gave me the date and I was like… that’s my birthday, let’s do it!

MC: You got a big celebration set up?

KK: I’m a man of many mysteries. I don’t want to say too much. I’ll have all of Brooklyn showing up to my sh*t!

MC: Did you produce the whole album?

KK: I produced, I wrote the songs, I rapped everything. There are no features on this album. It’s all me. I just wanted a very personal album that engaged the fans that have been rocking with me for so long.

I dropped Late Knight Special when I was 19 and was still becoming a man then. I feel like I didn’t get to articulate myself the way I wanted to. I think this album is really about my growth. People are seeing me, like, making R&B and pop songs. I’m trying to get my credit and get what I deserve.

MC: Speaking of growth, how are you showing your maturation here? What kind of man have you become?

KK: I believe I’m a man at this point. I moved out of my mother’s house when I was 15, 16. That’s when everything started to formulate for me. Like, I started to realize about bills and stuff! You get older and realize the consequences of not paying them on time and how it affects your credit score and then you can’t get a crib.

When you start understanding all those things it just naturally affects the music. You realize the responsibilities you have as a human being and as a man.

MC: You’re not breaking down how to check your credit score on the album, but it definitely is a more mature effort. Do you worry about those fans who have been rocking with you for so long being like, “this isn’t the Kirk Knight we partied with back then”?

KK: No because I feel like I’m genreless. Music and any person’s album is a chapter from their life. Not every chapter is the same in a book. If they were, that’d be a boring book!

MC: You’ve mentioned in past interviews about being in touch with your feminine side, is that something you still feel comfortable with? Not always the easiest thing to claim in rap music.

KK: I’m extremely comfortable with myself and my sound. I’m comfortable with my ambition and my passion. I try to compare myself, like when I was younger I’d compare myself to other people’s aspirations but I couldn’t really relate. If I couldn’t personally relate, I could let my music reach others. There could be these feelings that I don’t relate to but someone else could. A huge thing for me was realizing that the world isn’t built around one person.

 

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